Best Turntable in 2022

Updated: August 25,2022

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Trends are cyclical, and no market makes this quite as evident as the vinyl record market, whose rapid resurgence took the world by storm.  Unlike records themselves, record players have greatly evolved over time, and what was the best turntable some years ago is not what you need now. 

Whether you’re a proud vintage-vinyl owner or a newbie looking to purchase your first disk, you won’t make a mistake by sticking with the top choices from our list.

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5

Excellent

Pro-Ject Juke Box E
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4

Good

Audio-Technica AT-LP60XBT
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4

Good

Sony PS-LX310BT
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4

Good

Clearaudio Concept
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3.5

Average

Rega Planar 1

Pro-Ject Juke Box E

5
Excellent
Pro-Ject Juke Box E open Pro-Ject Juke Box E headshell Pro-Ject Juke Box E details
Motor:
Belt-drive
Operating speed:
33 and 45 RPM
Dimensions:
415 x 118 x 334 mm
Built-in preamp:
Yes
Connectivity:
Bluetooth
What we liked
  • All-in-one
  • Bluetooth connectivity
  • Remote control
  • Excellent audio
What we disliked
  • Remote button layout
Where to Buy
At AMAZON
Price
VISIT SITE

The first turntable we’ll review is the Pro-Ject Juke Box E. Anyone even remotely interested in turntables has surely heard of Pro-Ject Audio Systems, an Austrian manufacturer that turned 30 this year. 

The Juke Box E came out in 2018, and it’s one of the best–value turntable options on the market. This is an all-in-one system with Bluetooth and IR receivers and remote control. The device is composed of the popular Primary turntable and an Ortofon OM 5E cartridge. While most all-in-one turntables compromise sound quality to a certain degree to support so many options, the Juke Box E seems to avoid these pitfalls.

Build

The Juke Box E is a belt-drive player with an Ortofon OM 5E cartridge and utilizes the tried and tested Primary turntable – probably the best turntable under 200 dollars you can get on the market. That alone puts Juke Box E slightly above its competitors in the same price range.

There are RCA outputs at line and preamp/phono level, as well as RCA line-level input, next to Bluetooth and IR. The IR is there for the remote control. Of course, since this is an all-in-one turntable setup, it comes with a built-in preamp (50W per channel – 4 ohms).

This turntable can be used right out of the box: The cartridge comes pre-fitted, and the tracking force and anti-skating force are also adjusted beforehand. And if you still don’t think this is the top choice at this price, just wait till you experience its seamless speaker pairing. 

If you want to go the extra mile, you can get it with Speaker Box 5 speakers at an additional cost, but even without them, the Juke Box E will connect to your existing stereo setup without a hitch.

This record turntable package includes speaker cables, a dust cover, and the aforementioned remote control. While having a remote is nice and dandy, the button layout is somewhat counterintuitive. Still, this is a pretty small downside to an otherwise very good record player.

Sound Quality

While most audio-elitists will probably roll their eyes at all-in-one turntables, the Juke Box E managed to beat many of its equally-priced brethren. 

The fidelity is definitely there, you get a warm sound, and the instruments have weight to them. Of course, the Juke Box E can’t match expensive ‘true hi-fi’ turntables, but it can certainly punch above its weight class. 

Surface noise is at negligible levels as well; if you really want to get the most out of this turntable, try removing the dust cover, as it can impact sound quality. While this may not be the world’s best turntable, the Juke Box E is certainly good enough to satisfy all but the pickiest users.

Price

This device will set you back between $599 and $699, depending on the supplier. If you want the speakers too, be ready to part with around $150 more.

Final Thoughts

We found the Pro-Ject Juke Box E to be a great affordable turntable. Ease of use is its main strength, added to the fact that it doesn’t suffer from the usual audio shortcomings plaguing all-in-one turntables. All in all, it’s a good record player, suitable for new and old vinyl lovers alike.

Audio-Technica AT-LP60XBT

4
Good
Audio-Technica AT-LP60XBT side Audio-Technica AT-LP60XBT headshell Audio-Technica AT-LP60XBT front
Motor:
Belt-drive
Operating speed:
33 ⅓ and 45 RPM
Dimensions:
359.5 x 97.5 x 373.3 mm
Built-in preamp:
Yes
Connectivity:
Bluetooth
What we liked
  • Very affordable
  • Well-known manufacturer
  • Fully automated
  • Lightweight
What we disliked
  • Cheapish plastic used
Where to Buy
At AMAZON
Price
VISIT SITE

Next up on our list we have the Audio-Technica AT-LP60XBT. Audio-Technica is no small fry in the turntable world - far from it. It’s a reputable company with a long track record of manufacturing great turntables for beginners and those who can’t afford to spend a fortune on getting superb sound. 

The AT-LP60XBT is one of the least expensive yet solid record players you can find, available for as little as $200. While not packing the most high-quality components in the world, the sound quality is pretty good, and Bluetooth makes it ideal for cable-averse users.

Build

Unfortunately, this Bluetooth turntable had to be built with subpar materials to maintain decent sound quality but keep the price low. While it’s probably one of the better inexpensive options, the AT-LP60XBT might feel a tad too cheaply-built to the touch. 

Thin plastic is the predominant ingredient in the casing, which makes the device extremely lightweight - picking it up feels like playing with a toy. Not that this hurts the turntable’s performance, but it might be a turnoff for users who prefer sturdier designs.

The AT-LP60XBT is a belt-drive turntable. This is usually a good choice for home use due to better sound quality, but don’t expect to do any DJ shenanigans with it. The turntable is fully automatic (as any good affordable turntable should be) since it’s mostly beginners who opt for these devices. 

With automated turntables, you don’t have to worry about accidentally damaging the tonearm or stylus when starting or stopping a record.

The platter is made of aluminum and comes with a dual magnet cartridge. This is a record player with Bluetooth connectivity, allowing you to pair it with speakers or headphones. The built-in phono equalizer function alleviates the need for an external phono stage/preamp, but you can still connect one if you have it. For wired connections, a detachable RCA output cable is included as well.

Like any budget record player worth its salt, the AT-LP60XBT plays both 33 ⅓ and 45 RPM records, as there is a 45 RPM adapter included in the box, along with a plastic dust cover.

Sound Quality

While design concessions have obviously been made, this turntable sounds better than a device this affordable has any right to. The presentation is spot-on, with warm sound and proper fidelity. It might sound slightly subpar when it comes to lower frequencies due to the built-in equalizer. 

However, if you connect your external amp, you should experience a solid increase in sound quality. One way or another, this is probably the best budget turntable, and you’ll struggle to find anything as good in this price range.

Price

The main strength of this Audio Technica turntable is the balance of pricing and quality, as you can find the AT-LP60XBT for as low as $199 on Amazon.

Final Thoughts

The Audio-Technica AT-LP60XBT combines excellent sound quality and Bluetooth connectivity with relatively low pricing to make a turntable ideal for beginners.

Sony PS-LX310BT

4
Good
Sony PS-LX310BT front Sony PS-LX310BT back Sony PS-LX310BT up
Motor:
Belt-drive
Operating speed:
33 ⅓ and 45 RPM
Dimensions:
430 x 108 x 367 mm
Built-in preamp:
Yes
Connectivity:
Bluetooth
What we liked
  • Easy Bluetooth pairing
  • Good build
  • Aluminum tonearm
  • Gain switch
What we disliked
  • Not for hardcore audiophiles
Where to Buy
At AMAZON
Price
VISIT SITE

We present to you one of today’s best deals from a leading digital publisher and electronics manufacturer - the Sony PS-LX310BT. 

There’s no need to waste words on describing how influential Sony is not only in gaming but also in the record player market, so we’ll get right to the point: The PS-LX310BT is an exceptional entry-level turntable for under $300. 

Sony packed it with features and made it affordable yet not cheap-looking. This budget-friendly contender comes with Bluetooth connectivity, auto playback, and an integrated preamp - a bargain indeed!

Build

The most common method of cutting costs when manufacturing a turntable record player is by utilizing cheap plastic, and, at first glance, Sony’s best starter turntable is no different. But, even though the chassis is mostly plastic, the platter and the tonearm are both made of aluminum. 

A tonearm made of quality material is essential, as plastic ones feel extremely fragile and affect the sound negatively. You can't exactly expect a carbon fiber tonearm at this price, though.  Additionally, the rest of the device has a matte finish for extra visual appeal.

Like the previously reviewed turntables, the Sony PS-LX310BT is also a belt-drive device. It operates at two speeds - 33 ⅓ and 45 RPM, thanks to a 45-RPM adapter. Most of the best entry-level turntable options are, naturally, aimed at those just starting their vinyl collection. 

As one such option, the PS-LX310BT comes with a built-in phono preamp and an MM cartridge perma-mounted to the tonearm, saving you the hassle of setting it up. The only thing you have to do after taking the turntable out of the box is position the platter and pull the belt over the pulley. Plug it into a power source, and you’re ready to spin.

Going cordless is all the rage these days. To that end, this Bluetooth turntable allows you to place your speakers in otherwise unreachable places - so long as they’re within signal range - or move around the house with your headphones on. 

Of course, there’s something to be said about the loss of sound quality with Bluetooth-powered listening, but newer technologies minimize this drawback as well. Pairing up is easy: just put your speakers or headphones in pairing mode and press the Bluetooth button on the Sony PS-LX310BT.

Besides being one of the top Bluetooth record-player choices out there, this is also a fully automated turntable, so the tonearm will fall into place by itself when you press the Play button and raise itself once the record ends. 

Another great feature is the gain selection switch. You can adjust it to high, low, or mid to match the audio level of your record. The device also has a USB output socket, RCA cables, a built-in phono stage, and a phono/line selector switch.

Sound Quality

As previously mentioned in our record-player reviews, we were surprised by how good a budget record player can sound. Similar to the reviewed Audio Technica model, Sony’s turntable manages to beat all expectations. 

The instruments are weighty, and the sound is full, with the gain switch allowing you to get even more out of each record. Even the built-in preamp performs admirably. However, you can boost sound quality by using an external phono preamp.

Price

This turntable currently costs $250 on Sony’s website, and its combination of features and sound quality is tough to match in the under-$300 range.

Final Thoughts

The best affordable record player award goes to Sony’s PS-LX310BT. The aluminum tonearm makes up for the otherwise plastic frame, and the matte finish makes this turntable look like a $500 device, while the features, sound quality, and overall ease of use are practically unmatched by any of its competitors in this price range.

Clearaudio Concept

4
Good
Clearaudio Concept headshell Clearaudio Concept front Clearaudio Concept back
Motor:
Belt-drive
Operating speed:
33 ⅓, 45, and 78 RPM
Dimensions:
420 x 350 x 125 mm
Built-in preamp:
No
Connectivity:
N/A
What we liked
  • Unmatched sound quality
  • Vintage-like look
  • Possibility to choose between tonearms
  • Easy to set up
What we disliked
  • Pricey
Where to Buy
At CLEARAUDIO
Price
VISIT SITE

A beast of an entirely different kind, the Clearaudio Concept is an excellent turntable for vintage sticklers. While the previous options we’ve reviewed stood in the budget category, you should be ready to shell out big bucks for this premium device. This is also the first vintage record player we’re showcasing here – or at least a vintage-looking one.

Build

You can say goodbye to plastic-ridden turntables – we’re in the big leagues now. The box is made up of medium-density or pressure-formed solid wood, either in a single color or with wooden accents for a true vintage feel. Unlike its cheaper plastic competitors, the Clearaudio Concept has a solid weight to it.

As you’d expect at this price range, Clearaudio Concept is a belt-drive turntable. From a purely sound-oriented standpoint, the improved dampening on these models puts them a whole class above everything else on the market. 

If you choose to buy it with a cartridge and tonearm, you can get the Concept MM, Concept MC, or Essence MC cartridge. The tonearm can either be the Concept or the Satisfy Kardan variant.

The optional cartridge/tonearm setup will be fitted in the factory, so the only thing you’ll need to do is position the platter and pull the belt around the pulley. This sets the Concept apart from other expensive turntable options, which often require a bit of advanced knowledge to properly install.

Another aspect of the Clearaudio Concept distinguishing it from cheaper vinyl players is its three operating speeds, as opposed to two: 33 ⅓, 45, and 78 RPM. Consider upgrading the cartridge if you have a 78-heavy record collection, as prolonged use might cause some wear.

While classic turntable lovers will absolutely adore the stylish design of the Clearaudio Concept, futurism-oriented users will lament the lack of Bluetooth and USB connectivity. The best record–player brands often omit Bluetooth from their pricier devices. 

This may come as a surprise to some, having in mind how expensive this turntable is, but the hardcore vinyl market considers it an unnecessary gimmick.

Sound Quality

Clearaudio Concept’s sound quality is top-class. If you’re switching from a budget turntable, the difference in sound will be evident even to the most untrained ear. All frequencies, including the lower registers where more affordable turntables fail, are as crisp or as weighty as they should be.

All melodies played during our turntable reviews sounded warm and precise. Remember to provide proper support for the turntable to stand on to maximize the sound quality.

Price

Now we get to the iffy part – the pricing. If you want a top-notch record player setup, you need to be ready to part with a considerable sum of money. The current price of the Clearaudio Concept is an exorbitant $1,800 with the cartridge and $1,600 without one.

Final Thoughts

The Clearaudio Concept is a solid competitor to other heavyweights such as the Rega P5 and is the best turntable setup on our list if you can afford it. It’s got remarkable sound quality, a stunning design, and three available speeds to accommodate even the pickiest connoisseur – just be ready to part with a month’s rent to get one.

Rega Planar 1

3.5
Average
Rega Planar 1 side Rega Planar 1 headshell Rega Planar 1 open
Motor:
Belt-drive
Operating speed:
33 and 45 RPM
Dimensions:
447 x 117 x 360 mm
Built-in preamp:
No
Connectivity:
N/A
What we liked
  • Looks terrific
  • Best sound quality in class
  • Plug-and-play
  • Excellent motor and tonearm
What we disliked
  • Nothing at this price
Where to Buy
At AMAZON
Price
VISIT SITE

What constitutes the best budget record player? For those unable to spend $1,000+ on their musical hobby, a $150 turntable is considered a budget solution. However, by vinyl-market standards, everything below $500 is very affordable, and that’s where you’ll find the Rega Planar 1. 

This turntable actually came out back in 2005 under the moniker P1. However, it has undergone significant modifications over the years, retaining its distinguishable sound quality while improving on various aspects, allowing it to keep its title as the best turntable under 500 bucks.

Build

The Rega Planar 1 rocks a slick, minimalistic design that fits perfectly in any environment. The plinth looks laminated – a change from the original P1’s textured surface. The ON/OFF switch has also been relocated underneath the plinth to avoid any interruptions to the glossy surface. 

There are two colors available, black and white, and we found both to be equally appealing. The newest version of the Rega Planar 1 for 2021 has a matte finish, which also looks very stylish.

The addition of an RB110 tonearm is another reason why the Planar 1 is considered to be the best turntable for the money, regardless of your budget. The platter has undergone changes as well, with the new flywheel effect bringing further improvements to sound quality. 

Since both the tonearm and the carbon moving magnet cartridge are fitted at the factory, the Planar 1 is a true Plug & Play device: Enjoy your records the moment you get it out of the box.

Rega Planar 1 is a belt-drive turntable. Rega used a 24 V low-noise synchronous motor to reduce vibrations for better sound quality than other players in this price range can manage. This is actually the first Rega turntable in this category to utilize this type of motor, but it performs admirably.

The supported speeds are 33 ⅓ and 45 RPM – no 78 RPM here. The Planar 1 also has no preamp built in, but thankfully, you can snag a great amp – like Brio – from Rega’s website, too. Unpack the Planar 1, connect it to the preamp, and you’ll be all set to hear that sweet sound of vinyl records.

Sound Quality

If you’re impressed by the build and looks of the Rega Planar 1, wait until you hear it. 

The P1 is considered by many to be the best vinyl player in its price range, owing its huge popularity and longevity to the distinct sound quality. Many fans were worried that these recognizable audio capabilities might change or worsen with the alterations made to the turntable over the years.

They didn’t need to worry, though:  we’re happy to report that the Planar 1 sounds incredible, and any record you put on sounds great. The bass is strong but not too heavy, the instruments all sound spot-on, and everything is precise, textured, and crisp. Even the top models in the budget class can’t go head-to-head with the Planar 1.

Price

The Rega Planar 1 can currently be found for $475 on Amazon, but you might be able to get it for as low as $400 from other suppliers.

Final Thoughts

We’ve been trying hard to find some sort of weakness or fault with the Rega Planar 1, but there was none to find. From the visuals to the hardware and audio quality, the Planar 1 wins on all fronts.

Evaluation Process

Evaluation Process

The main obstacle prospective turntable buyers face is coming to grips with their various technical aspects and complicated naming conventions. Thanks to this, finding the best models becomes an extremely arduous task for people unfamiliar with vinyl-player technology and the various device specifications. 

To help with that, we’ll go through the crucial technical characteristics of a vinyl record player by which we reviewed and ranked turntables.

Turntable Phonograph Design

Motor configuration is probably the most significant difference between turntable models. There are three main types of motor configuration - belt-drive, idler, and direct-drive. With direct-drive turntables, the motor is positioned right beneath the center of the platter. 

On the other hand, a belt drive is a staple of the best record players, with the motor positioned off-center and connected to the platter with an elastomeric drive belt. Lastly, idler motors utilize an idler wheel to transmit rotations from the motor to the platter, but these are far less frequent among modern turntables.

Why are these distinctions important? The answer is damping, or how manufacturers tackle vibrations caused by the motor and outside sources. For example, direct-drive record players are much more resistant to outside forces and feature faster start-up speeds. 

In fact, one of the main advantages of a direct-drive turntable is its suitability for DJ-ing. Their design allows DJs to stop, slow down, speed up, backspin, or scratch the vinyl. 

On the other hand, DJs usually avoid belt-drive turntables since any of the tricks we mentioned can cause damage to the cable. Still, the motor position in a direct-drive turntable leads to more sound-altering vibration, whereas belt-drive devices offer more fidelity, as they handle vibrations much more efficiently. 

The right decision ultimately depends on what you want to do with the device.

Manual vs. Automated Turntables

In your search for the best record player, you’ll come across the terms “manual” and “automatic” in reference to the movements of the tonearm and needle. With manual turntables, you physically place the tonearm and stylus in the correct position when you want to play vinyl and raise it once you want to stop. 

Semiautomatic turntables require you to lower the tonearm manually but automatically lift it and stop the motor once a side has finished playing.

With an automatic turntable, the tonearm automatically falls into position and raises itself once that vinyl side ends. If you don’t want the hassle of manually moving the tonearm every time, you should probably go with one of the automatic turntable options. 

However, some connoisseurs believe that the many moving parts negatively affect sound quality. Additionally, many vinyl lovers prefer to conduct the needle-placing ritual themselves for sentimental reasons - it all depends on what you like.

Turntable Phono Stage/Preamp

You can’t simply connect a turntable to your existing sound system as you would to your TV: The signal coming out of the turntable cartridge is much lower than the one emanating from standard stereo devices. 

In order to get around this, turntables require a phono stage to boost the frequency to a level required by your stereo system. It can be an internal or separate phono preamp.

The best vinyl record players sometimes come with a built-in turntable preamp. While some audiophiles might prefer to keep it separate, the choice usually boils down to what kind of stereo system you have set up. 

Newly-minted vinyl lovers will probably appreciate a turntable preamp shipped with the record player - we know we do. Turntables with an integrated phono stage (also known as an integrated phono preamp) are often referred to as ‘all-in-one,’ and they can save users plenty of setup time.

Newer turntable models sometimes include built-in speakers, but these can rarely match the sound quality provided by standalone models. Still, the top all-in-one turntables with an integrated preamp and powered speakers let you start listening to your favorite records right off the bat. Just keep in mind that if a budget turntable has its own phono stage, the sound quality may suffer.

Design

As any vinyl fan will tell you, turntables are much more than mere record-playing devices. They represent atmospheric set pieces, an essential part of the decor, and a nostalgia-packed symbol of the ages past.

To that end, their design is often as important as their technical specifications. Some turntables lean strongly toward the vintage feel, while others are sleek futuristic machines and pay special attention to how visually attractive the turntable is.

USB and Bluetooth Connectivity

A good Bluetooth turntable gives you an easy way to connect the player to your sound system. More and more turntables nowadays ship with Bluetooth devices, which can be a lifesaver for people fed up with cable management and odd speaker placement. 

However, since Bluetooth connections are digital, the sound data gets compressed, resulting in a slight drop in audio quality. However, newer Bluetooth variants allow more data to come through, lessening the sound quality differences.

Another way to integrate the turntable with your other sound tech is via USB. Good turntables allow you to rip music from your records into digital files and listen to your favorite vinyl on other devices - at a lower quality, of course. If this is something that interests you, finding a USB turntable is easy enough.

FAQ

What is the best turntable on the market?

While it’s hard to pick out a single product in such a varied market, the best - and most expensive - turntable we’ve reviewed here is the Clearaudio Concept.

What is the best turntable ever made?

This title goes to the vintage Linn LP 12, which holds a near-legendary status among vinyl lovers. Unfortunately, its price is quite legendary, too.

Is a direct drive better than a belt-drive turntable?

Both direct-drive and belt-drive turntables can provide excellent sound quality. Direct-drive turntables are more durable, while belt-drive devices are considered better audio-wise.

How much should you spend on a turntable?

While there’s no exact answer here, ultra-affordable turntables can sometimes damage your records. We recommend investing at least $100 into a turntable to get the best value for your money.

Do vintage turntables sound better?

Vintage turntables were made from better materials compared to today’s budget models, so you can often - but not always - get a better sound from them. That said, modern high-end turntables are just as good, if not better.

Do expensive turntables sound better?

Yes. Due to the quality of their overall design and materials used, the best turntable choices are generally costly but provide a much better sound quality than their more affordable counterparts.

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